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Pearl Jam ‘Yield’ to Maturity

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In the years after Pearl Jam became a blockbuster band, the group became embroiled in high-minded and self-protective battles. They stopped playing venues associated with Ticketmaster, whom they sued. They stopped making music videos. They stopped giving interviews. And they nearly stopped being a band.But with maturity often comes some measure of wisdom and acceptance. In the back half of the ’90s, Pearl Jam began to soften some of their hardline stances, not as a betrayal of their ethics but as a method to focus on the music. They ceased putting up stop signs and learned to yield – which became the name of the rockers’ fifth album.“I think the title Yield has to do with maybe being more comfortable within ourselves, with this band,” guitarist Mike McCready said in 1998. “Whereas the earlier records were like Vs. – we were kind of reacting to the storm of press and craziness that was happening. Now, we’re all a little bit older and a little more relaxed and maybe just kind of yielding to those anxieties and not trying to fight it so much.”Some of that comfort came in the form of increasing collaboration within Pearl Jam. Near the end of the recording process for 1996’s No Code, frontman Eddie Vedder spoke frankly to his bandmates (McCready, guitarist Stone Gossard, Jeff Ament and drummer Jack Irons) about wanting the band to be more democratic, in terms of the lyrical and conceptual burden, on the next record. Vedder would remain the primary lyricist, but yearned for some of that weight to be alleviated.The guys responded to the request, with Irons contributing the music and lyrics for one track (“Untitled”), Gossard writing two (“No Way,” “All Those Yesterdays”) and Ament also penning two (“Pilate,” “Low Light”) – which were the bassist’s first lyrics written for a Pearl Jam record. Unlike the band’s previous four albums, Yield would find Vedder singing words which did not originate with him.“I think the fact that everybody had so much input into the record, like everybody really got a little bit of their say on the record,” Ament told MTV, “and I think because of that, everybody feels like they’re an integral part of the band.”That shift meant that the members of Pearl Jam came to their 1997 sessions at Seattle’s Studio Litho and Studio X with more concrete musical ideas and more complete songs. Producer Brendan O’Brien noticed the change between the rough-hewn “we’ll figure it out as it goes” aesthetic of No Code and the bolder, hookier material that would fill Yield.“I remember there was a concerted effort to really put together the best, more accessible songs they possibly could,” O’Brien told Spin in 2001.Many of the tracks were Pearl Jam’s most aggressive in a while, from the chugging kickoff of “Brain of J.” to the glimmering distortion of “MFC” to Vedder’s maniacal howl on “Do the Evolution.” The album’s lead single, “Given to Fly,” would earn comparisons to Led Zeppelin – albeit the gentler, folksy “Going to California” and not something Hammer of the Gods-like.“Given to Fly,” with its steady rise of melody and power, became the band’s biggest hit in a couple of years, going to No. 21 on the Bilboard chart. It also encapsulated the balance discovered by a more mature Pearl Jam on Yield. This album contained a synthesis of arena and punk rock influences, melodies and experiments, blazing guitar and strummed whispers. And it all seemed so comfortable.The lyrics reinforced that comfort and maturity. With all members now in their 30s, they took a more contemplative but positive look at life’s struggles. Vedder and pals drew from literature (Charles Bukowski, Daniel Quinn’s Ishmael) as well as more personal feelings about the future (“Low Light”), interaction (“In Hiding”) and the power of love in the face of struggle (“Given to Fly”).Pearl Jam put out Yield on Epic Records on Feb. 3, 1998, selling hundreds of thousands of copies in the first week of release, although the album was kept at No. 2 on the U.S. charts by the Titanic soundtrack. The band’s fifth album was the first to not top the Billboard chart, although it gradually went platinum and eventually outsold No Code.Yield was greeted with enthusiastic reviews, many of which hailed the record as something of a return to form. The record’s commercial success was also aided by Pearl Jam’s willingness to actually promote this album (which had been lacking on past releases) with press interviews, a music video (co-directed by Spawn creator Todd McFarlane and Batman: The Animated Series director Kevin Altieri) and an enormous tour that took the band to Australia and all over North America.However, between the Oceanic portion of the trek and the Stateside dates, drummer Irons decided that the big tour was too much for him and he departed the band after about four years behind the kit. Pearl Jam recruited Matt Cameron (of the recently disbanded Soundgarden) to play the North American shows and he’s been part of the group ever since.Cameron’s first run with Pearl Jam was recorded for the band’s first-ever concert album, Live on Two Legs, which was released in the fall of 1998 and featured hits, fan favorites and tunes from Yield. The new stuff fit comfortably amongst the steadily growing Pearl Jam oeuvre.“Yield was a superfun record to make,” Ament reflected. “And so much of it was Ed kind of sitting back; we worked on all of our songs before we worked on any of his stuff. That was a huge thing.”

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Dennis Edwards of the Temptations Dies

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Former Temptations lead singer Dennis Edwards died at the age of 74 in a Chicago hospital, his family has confirmed. The cause of death was complications from meningitis, with which he’d been diagnosed last May. Today (Feb. 3) would have been his 75th birthday.His friend Ronald Isley of the Isley Brothers told the St Louis Post-Dispatch, “We prayed for him and hoped he would get himself together and be able to come back. But he’s with the Lord now.” He added, “He had a gift, a talent and he really sang. There aren’t many people left with voices like his.”Edwards was a member of the iconic soul band from 1968 until 1977 — a time when their sound shifted to a grittier, more psychedelic direction — and appeared on hit singles including “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone,” “Ball of Confusion” and “I Can’t Get Next to You.”He began singing in gospel choirs before studying music at college and then joined the Contours in the early ‘60s. The Temptations hired him after dismissing David Ruffin, and his rougher voice helped inspire a move towards the sound that pushed them to the top of the charts. They won Grammys for “Cloud Nine” and “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone,” and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1989. Edwards was given a Lifetime Achievement Grammy for his work with the Temptations in 2013. After leaving the band he returned three times, with his final stint taking place from 1987 to 1989.Otis Williams, the last remaining original member of The Temptations, tweeted via the band’s official account, “Very sad to learn of the passing of our brother, Dennis Edwards. He is now at peace, and our love and prayers go out to his family. We acknowledge his extraordinary contribution to the Temptations’ legacy, which lives on in the music.”Others who paid tribute included Smokey Robinson, who told Rolling Stone: “It really saddens me to know that another Motown soldier is gone.” Whitesnake leader David Coverdale tweeted: “RIP an amazing singer… thoughts & prayers to his family, friends and fans.” Vernon Reid of Living Colour described Edwards as an “indelibly identifiable stylist, too often overlooked in the pantheon of R&B’s very greatest artists.”As much as the Ruffin-era Temptations hits — “My Girl,” “Ain’t Too Proud to Beg,” “I Wish It Would Rain” defined Motown’s first wave of soul classics, the tracks on which Edwards sang helped ushered in a new period for the label, one in which they branched out into social commentary, including “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone,” “Ball of Confusion.” As much as those hits are associated with the headlines of the late ’60s and early ’70s, they’ve remained relevant through covers by a wide variety of artists, which you can hear below. 

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(Spoiler) Big Potential Super Bowl Halftime Show Secret Revealed

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As with every year, the halftime show for tomorrow’s Super Bowl, which will be held at the U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, promises big surprises.Hopefully our headline was enough to stop you if you didn’t want to know this in advance – word is leaking out that Justin Timberlake’s set will include a hologram to honor hometown hero Prince.UPDATE: Sheila E. says “there is no hologram.” The news comes via TMZ, who don’t say if this will mean Prince will appear in hologram form, or if it will be an image with which he is associated (purple raindrops, the Love Symbol, etc.). Their sources saw four run-throughs of Timberlake’s performance, noting that one of them was filmed in case Timberlake has to cancel at the last minute for some reason. They added that there will be plenty of fireworks inside the stadium, but there will neither be a reunion with his former group NSYNC nor an appearance by Janet Jackson, whose halftime show performance with Timberlake in 2004 introduced the phrase “wardrobe malfunction” into the vernacular.Prince’s sister, Tyka Nelson, has discussed the idea of a Prince hologram as part of an exhibition of her brother’s memorabilia that will take place in London this October. “A hologram could be done as long as it is of excellent quality,” she said. “It would have to allow the fans to experience Prince in the way he allowed us to experience his music.”Although 1991’s Diamonds and Pearls featured a hologram of Prince on the cover, he said in 1998 that he was against the against the idea, calling the use of technology that would allow him to perform with deceased musicians “the most demonic thing imaginable. Everything is as it is, and it should be. If I was meant to jam with Duke Ellington, we would have lived in the same age. That whole virtual reality thing… it really is demonic. And I am not a demon. Also, what they did with that Beatles song [“Free as a Bird”], manipulating John Lennon’s voice to have him singing from across the grave… that’ll never happen to me. To prevent that kind of thing from happening is another reason why I want artistic control.”Holograms will not be used at a tribute concert to Prince that will scheduled for April 21, the second anniversary of his death, at Minneapolis’ Target Center. Variety says that the Paisley Park Museum is putting on “Prince: Live on the Big Screen,” that will feature “newly remastered and never-before-released audio and video of Prince accompanied live on the Target Center stage by a super-group of musicians who performed alongside Prince throughout his legendary career.” The show is part of a four-day celebration of Prince’s life and music that will take place at Paisley Park from April 19-22.

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Levitation Jones Presents Post-Future Bass Music for Latest Releases

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Ever since Levitation Jones stepped in the bass music scene there’s been no looking back. He’s been featured on some game changing lineups like The Untz Festival, Suboctave, Farmfest and this year’s Fractal Beach. Jones also embarked on his own headlining tour last spring that spanned from February through June. Tour stops including Wormhole Wednesday, The Black Box and a two-night run in Atlanta proved to be a huge success. Mid December he also hit us with a new EP Lurk Skank. Levitation Jones’ 5- track EP includes heart-thumping bass that has a comparable sound. Levitation Jones Listen to “Lurk Skank” by Levitation Jones: With those cozy basslines, he has similar vibes of The Widdler. Most recently, Jones released a new tune through Subworld Audio that takes you on a unique journey though time and space. Appropriately named “Time Traveler”, the track has minimal sounds intertwined with dark vocals and low subs that gives this one a true underground feel. Listen to “Time Traveler” by Levitation Jones: Levitation Jones has come a long way in just a short few years production wise. We can’t wait to see how far he can push the creep factor on post-future tunes. Follow Levitation Jones: Facebook | SoundCloud | Instagram

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New Music: ‘Burst’ by DDark

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Longtime Prince collaborator Sheila E. has assured fans that he will not appear in hologram form as part of Justin Timberlake’s Super Bowl halftime show performance in Minneapolis tonight.”Family, I spoke w/Justin 2nite and he shared heartfelt words of respect for Prince & the Purple fans,” she wrote on Twitter. “I look 4wrd 2 seeing what I’m sure is going 2 be a spectacular halftime show. There is no hologram.”The original TMZ eyewitness reports from Timberlake’s rehearsals for the show only mentioned that there would be “a hologram to honor” Prince, the host city’s recently departed hometown hero – which could mean anything from doves to purple rain to who knows what. But speculation and negative reaction about the image of Prince himself turning up in hologram form immediately ran rampant on the internet.That included a pointed tweet from Sheila E. herself. “Prince told me don’t ever let anyone do a hologram of me,” she tweeted when the rumors first broke. “Not cool if this happens!”There is still no confirmation that an actual Prince hologram was ever planned as part of Timberlake’s show. “There is no hologram” is not the same as “the hologram has been cancelled.”Prince himself spoke out vehemently against such technology in a 1998 interview with Guitar World, calling it, “the most demonic thing imaginable. Everything is as it is, and it should be. If I was meant to jam with Duke Ellington, we would have lived in the same age. That whole virtual reality thing… it really is demonic. And I am not a demon. To prevent that kind of thing from happening is another reason why I want artistic control.”However, Prince reportedly died without leaving behind a will, leaving his estate in the control of his surviving relatives. “A hologram could be done as long as it is of excellent quality,” his sister Tyka Nelson said last year. “It would have to allow the fans to experience Prince in the way he allowed us to experience his music.”

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Eric Johnson Says He ‘Just Killed’ Himself Making Breakthrough LP

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As Eric Johnson’s 1990 breakthrough album Ah Via Musicom edges toward its 30th anniversary, the Austin guitarist is ready to pull back the curtain a bit in regards to the history of the LP.“I know it’s probably people’s favorite record I ever did, [but] that record is so beat to death,” he laughs during an interview with Ultimate Classic Rock. “I mean, I killed myself making that record, getting every single little note. I punched in and punched in to get every little riff perfectly played and in tune and perfectly executed. Not that there’s not other people that could do it better, but I mean, to my ability, I just killed myself making that record. It’s weird, because in some ways, it doesn’t really sound like it, but it’s one of the most punched-in records I ever made.”“Cliffs of Dover,” the mountain-scaling pile of riffs that has become Johnson’s calling card, is one song that had quite an evolution in the studio before finding its way to the version that became a radio hit that reached the Top 5 on Billboard’s Mainstream Rock chart.“If you listen to the start of the lead at the end, it’s a [Fender] Stratocaster,” he explains. “Then about 12 seconds into the lead, it turns into a [Gibson] 335. Because I cut live, the first part of the lead and then the last part of the lead, I didn’t like it. So I replayed the last part and I used a different guitar — a totally different guitar in a different studio — and if you listen to it, you can hear a little bit of difference, but it almost sounds like I just hit a gain switch.”Listen to Eric Johnson’s ‘Cliffs of Dover’ Similarly, album co-producer Richard Mullen stepped in on “Forty Mile Town,” helping to bring things home after Johnson got sick as they were in the closing moments of work on the Ah Via Musicom album.“It’s one of the last vocals that I did. The vocal you hear on that song is only part of me singing on that take,” he says. “I got so sick at the end, just as we were finishing up the record. I couldn’t even go into the studio. I have to thank Richard, who was engineer and co-producer with Stevie Ray Vaughan, and he was engineer and co-producer with me. I’d say that at least half of that vocal, he pulled off a demo of ‘Forty Mile Town’ and flew the vocal into the master, because I couldn’t even go into the studio. I was just completely trashed. So I owe it to him, he saved that song.”Ah Via Musicom was the first album the pair worked on together. Mullen soon became an important presence in Johnson’s world. “He had a beautiful ear, he played steel guitar and guitar, he sang like Christopher Cross. He was a great musician,” Johnson remembers. “He started working with Stevie Ray on the first two records. When you hear the first record, that’s Richard recording the whole thing, setting Stevie’s tone through the amps — he basically set everything up perfect and then Stevie came in and played the record. I think that’s fine that people know that, I mean, obviously, it’s Stevie’s incredible playing, singing and writing that made it, but Richard was very instrumental in setting up his career and getting his tone in the studio and the whole nine yards. He’s a very discerning musician, engineer and producer. He was just great at getting great guitar tones.”The success of Ah Via Musicom found Johnson on the road touring extensively, including a span of shows with Rush, who were touring in support of the Roll the Bones album at that time.“Those guys were really nice. We had just gotten finished doing six weeks in Europe and we were all coming home from Europe,” he says. “As we landed back in the States, we were like, Oh great, we get to go home! Then we got a call, ‘Well, do you want to open for Rush for six weeks?’ We said, ‘When does that tour start?’ They said, ‘Tomorrow.’ [Laughs] So we never got to go home. We were out for like three more months nonstop. But we did it anyhow and it was a nice opportunity. They had big crowds every night, so it was a very nice opportunity and it was good getting to know those guys.”Johnson admits there wasn’t too much hero worship going on at the time– mainly because he wasn’t all that familiar with the power trio’s music. “I didn’t really listen to their stuff — not that they weren’t really good. It’s like with the Who — I never listened to the Who,” he says. “As far as rock stuff, I was really into [Jimi] Hendrix, [Jeff] Beck, [Eric] Clapton and Free with Paul Rodgers — that kind of stuff. Mike Bloomfield and Electric Flag and then all of the Motown stuff. It’s weird. I think about that sometimes, like Pink Floyd, that was a parallel track — I don’t even know any of their songs. I kind of know ‘Comfortably Numb.’ And all of these groups are incredible, like Queen. They’re all incredible, but it was all kind of parallel tracks to me, I never really listened to a lot of that stuff, but they’re great — all of them are great.”Johnson is now back on the road, performing Ah Via Musicom in its entirety for the first time ever. He’s reunited with longtime touring mates — drummer Tommy Taylor and bassist Kyle Brock — who were also on the road with him for the original tour for the album in the ’90s. “Tommy’s just a real world-class drummer. He gets a great drum sound on his drums and he knows how to hit the drums,” Johnson says. “He has a balance to all of his drums. He’s got great parts,” adding that “Kyle is just a real magical player. Very original player. He’s got a great approach to music.”At the same time he’s celebrating Ah Via Musicom’s legacy, Johnson has released a new album, Collage, which reflects the more relaxed approach he takes toward recording music these days.Listen to Eric Johnson’s ‘Stratagem’ “I’m leaving stuff that maybe I wouldn’t have left before,” he says. “Little glitches or little things. I’m trying to look past that. So when I do that, it makes it more fun for me. Because then I’m just playing music and I’m not judging so harshly. At the same time, I want to try to do the best I can, but I think  all of the time that it’s supposed to be for fun and the performance, because that translates to the listener.”He found, in the studio, when he pulled back his obsessing over every inch of a song, it made a real difference. “It’s easier [now], in so much that I’m trying to have more fun and be a little more relaxed about not being so neurotic about if it’s not perfect,” he says. “I’ve kind of learned that the hard way, by making a number of records that were kind of maybe me being too neurotic about the imperfections. In retrospect, when I listen to them, it’s not that the music is bad, but i hear that intention in the music sometimes. It’s like, whatever our intent is, it has a tendency to seep into what we do. So at some point, I said, ‘I want to make better music, what do I need to do?’ And it wasn’t, ‘Oh, play louder, play faster or play more.’ It was play with more depth and play with more human emotion. To do that, I had to take a step back and go, ‘Well, that means I have to take more of the heart instead of the head.’”Now a number of decades removed from the start of his career, Johnson can look back on the time he spent working to break out of Texas and make a name for himself. There are conflicting stories about what lit the spark that helped him land his first major-label record deal. Some say that it was a helping hand from Christopher Cross — which makes sense, considering that Johnson had logged time as a member of Cross’ band early in his career. But it also could have been a little bit of divine purple intervention from Prince, who was reportedly a fan.“The truth is that Christopher Cross introduced me to Warner Bros. The only other truth to that is that, allegedly, Prince talked to people at Warner Bros.,” he admits. “Chris introduced me to Warner Bros., and I spent a couple of years just being groomed by them, just doing demos, meeting producers and living in L.A., but I hadn’t made a record yet. I never met Prince, but supposedly he called there and said, ‘Hey, this guy has got some talent — why don’t you sign him?’ Because it went from two years of doing demos to overnight they called and said, ‘Well, we’ve decided to sign you.’ I don’t know — I never substantiated that with Prince, so I don’t know if that’s true or not. I never met him, but what a genius.”  Top 100 Classic Rock Artists

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The Recording Academy Launches Task Force to Investigate Biases Against Women in the Grammys

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Neil Portnow, the president of the Recording Academy, told a Variety reporter that women need to “step up” in the music industry. This statement came directly after this year’s Grammy awards ceremony concluded, and also in the face of the trending #GrammysSoMale hashtag. The backlash against Portnow’s comment has lit the music industry ablaze, and now the Recording Academy has announced it will tackle the issue of gender inequality head-on. Portnow penned a letter announcing the Recording Academy will launch an independent task force to investigate biases that “impede female advancement in the music industry.” The letter leaves out concrete details, but it appears that Portnow, the Recording Academy and the Grammys will take this issue quite seriously. For this year’s Grammys, Alessia Cara came away as the only woman winner among the categories televised during the ceremony. Read Portnow’s full letter announcing the formation of the task force below: “To The Music Community… “After hearing from many friends and colleagues, I understand the hurt that my poor choice of words following last Sunday’s Grammy telecast has caused. I also now realize that it’s about more than just my words. Because those words, while not reflective of my beliefs, echo the real experience of too many women. I’d like to help make that right. “The Recording Academy is establishing an independent task force to review every aspect of what we do as an organization and identify where we can do more to overcome the explicit barriers and unconscious biases that impede female advancement in the music community. We will also place ourselves under a microscope and tackle whatever truths are revealed. “I appreciate that the issue of gender bias needs to be addressed in our industry, and share in the urgency to attack it head on. We as an organization, and I as its leader, pledge our commitment to doing that. We will share more information about the steps we are taking in the coming weeks. “Sincerely, President/CEO of the Recording Academy.” !function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s){if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function(){n.callMethod? n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments)};if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n; n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0′;n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0; t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)}(window, document,’script’,’https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’); fbq(‘init’, ‘270428839820698’); // Insert your pixel ID here. fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’); fbq(‘track’, ‘ViewContent’); (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.5&appId=366355696827687”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));(function(d, s, id) {var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.0”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, “script”, “facebook-jssdk”));

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The Long, Enduring History of ‘All Along the Watchtower’

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Ever since its release on 1967’s John Wesley Harding, Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower” has become one of his most enduring classics. We’re taking a look at how it has held up to numerous interpretations throughout the years.John Wesley Harding was Dylan’s return to his acoustic roots after his motorcycle accident. But rather than bring back the topical lyrics about civil rights and the Vietnam War, he continued the evocative, surreal images that made his previous three records — Bringing It All Back Home, Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde — so groundbreaking, adding biblical imagery that foreshadowed his born-again phase more than a decade later.Listen to Bob Dylan’s Version of ‘All Along the Watchtower’ Although John Welsey Harding was a critical and commercial success, “All Along the Watchtower” failed to chart when released as a single. It wasn’t until Jimi Hendrix released his version with the Experience that the public truly embraced the song.Hendrix was a known Dylan fan. He even once cleared a dance floor by demanding that “Blowin in the Wind” be played in a New York club. In a 1967 interview, Hendrix described Dylan’s influence on his own songwriting. “I could never write the kind of words he does,” Hendrix said. “But he’s helped me out in trying to write two or three words ’cause I’ve got a thousand songs that will never be finished. I just lie around and write about two or three words, but now I have a little more confidence in trying to finish one.”Hendrix acquired a copy of John Wesley Harding before the album’s official release and instantly knew he had to cover one of the tracks. Initially, he was planning to record “I Dreamed I Saw St. Augustine,” but after further consideration he chose “All Along the Watchtower.” Hendrix claimed he had a natural gravitation toward the track. “The songs Dylan usually gave me are so close to me that I feel like I wrote them myself,” he added. “With ‘Along the Watchtower’ I had that feeling.” Less than two months after Dylan recorded the original, Hendrix was in the studio laying down his version.Although Dylan’s take didn’t chart, Hendrix reached No. 20 with his cover, making it his highest-charting singe in the U.S. “He loved Bob Dylan,” producer Eric Kramer said during an interview with Sound on Sound. “He was fascinated by the color of the lyrics and the tone of the lyrics, and of course the chord sequences were wonderful. It was a very special song.”Listen to the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s Version of ‘All Along the Watchtower’In a 1995 interview with the Sun Sentinel, Dylan described his reaction to hearing Hendrix’s version. “It overwhelmed me, really,” he said. “He had such talent, he could find things inside a song and vigorously develop them. He found things that other people wouldn’t think of finding in there. He probably improved upon it by the spaces he was using. I took license with the song from his version, actually, and continue to do it to this day.”Praise can also be found in the booklet to Dylan’s Biograph box set, where he said, “I liked Jimi Hendrix’s record, and ever since he died I’ve been doing it that way. … Strange how when I sing it I always feel it’s a tribute to him in some kind of way.”When Dylan was honored as 2015’s MusiCares Person of the Year, he went out of his way to thank Hendrix during his acceptance speech. “We can’t forget Jimi Hendrix,” Dylan proclaimed. “He took some small songs of mine that nobody paid any attention to and brought them up into the outer limits of the stratosphere, turned them all into classics.” Since then, “All Along the Watchtower” has been covered countless times, particularly in concert, where, likely spurred by Hendrix’s take, it provides the opportunity for an instrumental blowout.Take a look below to see how it’s been interpreted by some other artists.The Brothers and Sisters (1969) Legendary producer Lou Adler assembled a gospel choir made up of some of the best backup singers in Los Angeles. Over a two-day span, they recorded 10 soulful renditions of Dylan’s work, resulting in the group’s only album, Dylan’s Gospel. It has been reissued several times since its initial release, most recently in 2014.XTC (1978) The British post-punk and New Wave group XTC included their cover of “All Along the Watchtower” on their 1978 debut, White Music.Bob Dylan and the Grateful Dead Dylan’s 1987 tour with the Grateful Dead, captured two years later on Dylan & the Dead, is considered among the career low points for both artists. However, the nightly blowout on “All Along the Watchtower” was a crowd favorite.Bob Dylan, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Mick Jagger, Elton John, Mike Love and Others (1988) Bob Dylan was one of several artists enshrined in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame on Jan. 20, 1988. At the event’s conclusion, George Harrison and Ringo Starr (who had also been inducted that day as part of the Beatles) led a who’s-who jam session of the classic Dylan track.U2 (1988)U2 started mixing their version of “All Along the Watchtower” into live shows as early as 1981. However, the song’s inclusion in the 1988 album and documentary Rattle and Hum made it a mainstay of their set list. They would go on to play it on all 47 dates of their Lovetown Tour.The Grateful Dead (1989) Following their tour with Dylan, the Grateful Dead regularly worked “All Along the Watchtower” into their shows. According to Setlist.fm, they performed it 118 times between 1987 and 1995.Dave Matthews Band, Phish, Gov’t Mule (’90s) Following the Dead’s lead, jam bands have historically been drawn toward Dylan’s catalog, so it should come as no surprise that three of the biggest groups in the genre — the Dave Matthews Band, Phish and Gov’t Mule — have covered “All Along the Watchtower.” DMBAlmanac, a website dedicated to archiving the set lists of Dave Matthews Band, claims the group has covered the song more than 750 times.Neil Young and Booker T. & the M.G.’s (1992) In 1992, Neil Young performed “All Along the Watchtower” with Booker T. & the M.G.’s at a 30th anniversary tribute to Dylan, a pairing that worked so well that Young asked the veteran soul group to serve as his backing band for a European tour a year later.Neil Young and Willie Nelson (1994) After the tour with Booker T. & the M.G.’s, Young kept the song alive in his set lists, including a duet with Willie Nelson a year later at Farm Aid.Eric Clapton and Lenny Kravitz (1999)Eric Clapton and Lenny Kravitz performed the song together as part of the “Concert of the Century.” The event took place on the White House lawn with Bill and Hilary Clinton in attendance.Taj Mahal (2001) Blues icon Taj Mahal took his turn covering “All Along the Watchtower” for his album Hanapepe Dream.Bruce Springsteen and Neil Young (2004) During the 2004 Vote for Change tour’s stop in Minneapolis, Young appeared during Bruce Springsteen’s set to perform “All Along the Watchtower.”The Fratellis (2007) The Scottish trio recorded its cover for the compilation album Radio 1: Established 1967.’Battlestar Galactica,’ ‘Sons of Anarchy’ and ‘Lucifer’ (2007) Part of the enduring legacy of “All Along the Watchtower” can be attributed to its continuous placement in pop culture. The song appears in films like A Bronx Tale, Watchmen and Forest Gump. It also found its way into three modern TV shows: an Eastern arrangement by composer Bear McCreary for Battlestar Galactica, a brooding version by Billy Valentine and the Forest Rangers for Sons of Anarchy and a searing piano jaunt performed by Lucifer star Tom Ellis.Eddie Vedder (2007)Pearl Jam performed the song on numerous occasions in the early ’00s. Then, Eddie Vedder contributed his voice to the soundtrack for the Dylan biopic I’m Not There. Vedder’s backing band on the track included members of Sonic Youth, Television and Wilco.Ed Sheeran and Devlin (2012)Ed Sheeran and English rapper Devlin collaborated on a cover of “All Along the Watchtower” in 2012 that became a Top 10 hit in Britain. Unlike previous covers, this one incorporated samples of both Dylan’s and Hendrix’s iconic versions. In 2018, the producers of the Amazon series Jack Ryan used it in a trailer that was released in conjunction with Super Bowl LII.John Mayer (2014) As befitting a guy who would soon be hanging out with three surviving members of the Grateful Dead, John Mayer covered “All Along the Watchtower” during his set at the 2014 Made in America festival in Los Angeles.Slash, Robby Krieger and Others (2014) A salute to Jimi Hendrix was held during the 2014 South by Southwest conference in Austin. Joining Slash and the Doors’ Robby Krieger onstage were Wayne Kramer (MC5), Perry Farrell (Jane’s Addiction) and Rusty Anderson from Paul McCartney’s band.Moon Taxi (2016) An eclectic lineup of musicians joined forces for a two-day event at the famed Ryman Auditorium in Nashville. Dubbed “Dylan Fest,” the celebration was designed to honor Bob Dylan’s 75th birthday. It featured performances by Emmylou Harris, Jason Isbell, Boz Scaggs, Kesha, Brendan Benson and many more. Indie rockers Moon Taxi delivered a frenetic version of “All Along the Watchtower.”

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Music Festival Fails To Get Liquor License Before Event

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Though its name suggests otherwise, Shipwrecked will indeed be “dry” this weekend. The a boutique music festival near Auckland, New Zealand, is still on schedule — but it’s missing an important detail. According to a report, the organizers failed to acquire a liquor license in time, so the show will go on as an alcohol-free event. While this probably won’t phase some people, it’s possible others that paid approximately $250 per ticket will be looking for some form of compensation for the mishap. Logan Baker of The Greatest Show on Earth assures “it’s still going to be a beautiful event” despite having no alcohol on the grounds. Some music festivals, like Shambhala in British Columbia for example, go on as dry festivals each and every year — so hopefully this isn’t a huge deal for music fans!   Source: Stuff !function(f,b,e,v,n,t,s){if(f.fbq)return;n=f.fbq=function(){n.callMethod? n.callMethod.apply(n,arguments):n.queue.push(arguments)};if(!f._fbq)f._fbq=n; n.push=n;n.loaded=!0;n.version=’2.0′;n.queue=[];t=b.createElement(e);t.async=!0; t.src=v;s=b.getElementsByTagName(e)[0];s.parentNode.insertBefore(t,s)}(window, document,’script’,’https://connect.facebook.net/en_US/fbevents.js’); fbq(‘init’, ‘270428839820698’); // Insert your pixel ID here. fbq(‘track’, ‘PageView’); fbq(‘track’, ‘ViewContent’); (function(d, s, id) { var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.5&appId=366355696827687”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, ‘script’, ‘facebook-jssdk’));(function(d, s, id) {var js, fjs = d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0]; if (d.getElementById(id)) return; js = d.createElement(s); js.id = id; js.src = “//connect.facebook.net/en_US/sdk.js#xfbml=1&version=v2.0”; fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js, fjs); }(document, “script”, “facebook-jssdk”));

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Don’t Do Rock Hall Inductions in Cleveland

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Howard Stern knows why Bon Jovi will finally be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame this year. “No one else wanted to go to Cleveland,” he joked on his SiriusXM show. “They said, ‘Who’s willing to go to Cleveland?’ Jon raised his hand.”Stern will be in Cleveland on April 14 for a ceremony to induct Bon Jovi into the Rock Hall. But he doesn’t seemed too thrilled about traveling to the city, which houses the Hall of Fame itself and which hosts the induction ceremony every three years. He suggested he had nothing against Cleveland, but he’s not too pleased about having to leave his home in New York City, which often hosts the induction ceremony.”For some reason, they must have some cockamamie deal that every once in a while they’ll actually shoot the celebration in Cleveland,” he said. “But it’s the stupidest f—ing thing. It’s already been explained to me, through the grapevine, that a lot of rock ‘n’ roll people are not even going to be in the audience — because it’s in Cleveland.”Stern, who admitted he’s the wrong person to make the speech, went on to say that the Hall is not doing itself any favors taping what should be a star-studded event in a location not known for its celebrity population. “Wouldn’t it be great television to suddenly see Bruce Springsteen or Sting, and it would be nice for the bands like the Moody Blues to see some of their contemporaries sitting in the audience,” he said. “That’s why you do it in New York or L.A., because that’s where these people are. They’re not in Cleveland and they don’t care about getting on a jet and going to Cleveland.”Stern said the show’s producers should take a cue from the New Year’s Rockin’ Eve program, where cameras “cut to Fergie in Los Angeles once in a while even though they’re doing it in Time Square. … Cut to Cleveland and have something going on there. Have Nina Simone sitting there.” When he was reminded that the singer, who is part of this year’s induction class, died in 2003, he joked, “Bring her casket.”The bottom line, Stern said, is that if you want to make good television, you “do it where there are people who are interesting to look at.” “Wait till I get up and make this speech,” he laughed. “Poor Jon and his band. I’m gonna lay it all out in my State of the Union. Because someone’s gotta educate people. It’s my role.”

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